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Employers of Nuclear Engineering majors in AR

Nuclear engineers research and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used to derive benefits from nuclear energy and radiation. Many of these engineers find industrial and medical uses for radioactive materials—for example, in equipment used in medical diagnosis and treatment. Nuclear engineers typically work in offices; however, their work setting varies with the industry in which they are employed. Most nuclear engineers work full time. Nuclear engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering. Employers also value experience, so cooperative-education engineering programs at universities are also valuable. The median annual wage for nuclear engineers was $104,270 in May 2012. Employment of nuclear engineers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment trends in power generation may be favorable because of the likely need to upgrade safety systems at powerplants.

Nuclear Engineers

Nuclear engineers research and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used to derive benefits from nuclear energy and radiation. Many of these engineers find industrial and medical uses for radioactive materials—for example, in equipment used in medical diagnosis and treatment. They conduct research on nuclear engineering projects or apply principles and theory of nuclear science to problems concerned with release, control, and use of nuclear energy and nuclear waste disposal. Nuclear engineers typically work in offices; however, their work setting varies with the industry in which they are employed. Most nuclear engineers work full time. Nuclear engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering. Employers also value experience, which can be gained through cooperative-education engineering programs. The median annual wage for nuclear engineers was $105,810 in May 2017. Employment of nuclear engineers is projected to grow 4 percent from 2016 to 2026, slower than the average for all occupations. Employment is projected to decline in electric power generation, but projected to increase in research and development in engineering, and in management, scientific, and technical consulting services.

Nuclear Power Reactor Operators

Operate or control nuclear reactors. Move control rods, start and stop equipment, monitor and adjust controls, and record data in logs. Implement emergency procedures when needed. May respond to abnormalities, determine cause, and recommend corrective action. The median annual wage for nuclear power reactor operators was $93,370 in May 2017.

Nuclear Technicians

Nuclear technicians assist physicists, engineers, and other professionals in nuclear research and nuclear energy production. They operate special equipment and monitor the levels of radiation that are produced. In nuclear power plants, nuclear technicians typically work in offices and control rooms where they use computers and other equipment to monitor and help operate nuclear reactors. Most nuclear technicians work full-time, variable schedules in the nuclear power industry. Their schedules may include working nights, holidays, and weekends. Nuclear technicians must take safety precautions to avoid exposure to radiation. Nuclear technicians typically need an associate’s degree in nuclear science or a nuclear-related technology. Nuclear technicians also go through extensive on-the-job training. The median annual wage for nuclear technicians was $80,370 in May 2017. Employment of nuclear technicians is projected to show little or no change from 2016 to 2026. Although technicians will be needed to help maintain and upgrade existing nuclear power plants, traditional forms of power generation will likely come under increasing pressure from alternative forms of energy.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10 companies
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Company City State
Entergy Nuclear Generation Company
Entergy
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, United States
NRC
Arkansas Nuclear One Inc
Proscan Imaging of Arkansas, LLC
University of Arkansas System
Uams Nuclear Medicine Tech
Central Arkansas Radiation Therapy Institute, Inc.
C A R T I
Quality Nuclear Services Inc
4d Peanut Gallery
4d Peanut Gallery
R K P Services Inc
Nuclear Advisory Inc
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10 companies
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