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Employers of Geology & Earth Science majors in VT

Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future. Most geoscientists split their time between working in offices and laboratories, and working outdoors. Doing research and investigations outdoors is commonly called fieldwork and can require extensive travel to remote locations and irregular working hours. Most geoscientist jobs require at least a bachelor’s degree. In several states, geoscientists may need a license to offer their services to the public. The median annual wage for geoscientists was $90,890 in May 2012. Employment of geoscientists is projected to grow 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for energy, environmental protection, and responsible land and resource management is projected to spur demand for geoscientists in the future.

Geoscientists

Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future. They Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists. Most geoscientists split their time between working indoors in offices and laboratories, and working outdoors. Doing research and investigations outdoors is commonly called fieldwork and can require irregular working hours and extensive travel to remote locations. Geoscientists need at least a bachelor’s degree for most entry-level positions. However, some workers begin their careers as geoscientists with a master’s degree. The median annual wage for geoscientists was $89,850 in May 2017. Employment of geoscientists is projected to grow 14 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for energy, environmental protection, and responsible land and resource management is projected to spur demand for geoscientists in the future.

Geological and Petroleum Technicians

Geological and petroleum technicians assist scientists or engineers in the use of electronic, sonic, or nuclear measuring instruments in both laboratory and production activities to obtain data indicating potential resources such as metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum. Analyze mud and drill cuttings. Chart pressure, temperature, and other characteristics of wells or bore holes. Investigate and collect information leading to the possible discovery of new metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum deposits. Geological and petroleum technicians typically need an associate’s degree or 2 years of postsecondary training in applied science or a science-related technology. Some jobs may require a bachelor’s degree. Geological and petroleum technicians also receive on-the-job training. The median annual wage for geological and petroleum technicians was $54,190 in May 2017. Employment of geological and petroleum technicians is projected to grow 16 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for natural gas is expected to increase demand for geological exploration and extraction in the future.

Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers

Mining and geological engineers design mines to safely and efficiently remove minerals such as coal and metals for use in manufacturing and utilities. Many mining and geological engineers work where mining operations are located, such as mineral mines or sand-and-gravel quarries, in remote areas or near cities and towns. Others work in offices or onsite for oil and gas extraction firms or engineering services firms. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited engineering program is required to become a mining or geological engineer. The median annual wage for mining and geological engineers was $94,240 in May 2017. Employment of mining and geological engineers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth for mining and geological engineers will be driven by demand for mining operations. In addition, as companies look for ways to cut costs, they are expected to contract more services with engineering services firms, rather than employ engineers directly.

Displaying 1 - 50 of 153 companies
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Company City State
United States Dept of Geological Survey
Vermont Land Trust, Inc
Randolph Technical Career Center
Rutland City Public Schools
Stafford Technical Center
Stone Environmental, Inc.
Vermont Association of Conservation Districts
VACD
Spaulding Uhsd 41
Barre Technical Center
Heindel & Noyes
Techtron Environmental, Inc
Oxbow Union High Sch Dist 30
River Bend Creer Technical Ctr
Burlington School District
Burlington Area Technical Ctr
River Valley Technical Center School District
Rvtc
Wagner, Heindel & Noyes Inc
New England Air Qulty Tstg Div
S.W. Cole Engineering, Inc.
Eiv Technical Services
Vermont Institute of Natural Science, Inc.
Simon Operation Services Inc
SOS
New England Research, Inc.
National Wildlife Federation
National Wildlife
Environmental Products & Services of Vermont, Inc.
Wilcox & Barton, Inc.
Maple Run Unified School District
Northwest Technical Center
The Nature Conservancy
Vermont Field Office
Lincoln Applied Geology, Inc.
Marlin Environmental Inc
Kas Inc.
Friends of Mad River
Vermont Green-Up, Incorporated
GREEN UP VERMONT
The Trust For Public Land
Vermont Natural Resource Council
VNRC
Sanborn, Head & Associates, Inc.
The Lake Champlain Basin Program
Neipcc
Merck Forest Foundation, Inc.
Merck Forest and Farmland Ctr
Lamoille County Natural Resources Conservation District
Four Winds Nature Institute, Incorporated.
FOUR WINDS INSTITUTE
Vermont Land Trust, Inc
Brighter Planet, Inc.
River Valley Technical Center Board of Education
Wildlife Management Institute, Incorporated
Vermont Academy of Arts & Science
Jnh Environmental Services, Incorporated
Coming Clean, Inc.
Ecs Holdco, Inc.
Abtec
Conservation Law Foundation, Inc.
Ross Environmental Associates Inc
R E A
Green Earth Environmental, Inc.
Verterre Group, The
New England Grassroots Environment Fund
Bonnyvale Environmental Education Center
BEEC
Harper Enviormental Inc
The Willowell Foundation Inc
Displaying 1 - 50 of 153 companies
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