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Employers of Geology & Earth Science majors in ME

Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future. Most geoscientists split their time between working in offices and laboratories, and working outdoors. Doing research and investigations outdoors is commonly called fieldwork and can require extensive travel to remote locations and irregular working hours. Most geoscientist jobs require at least a bachelor’s degree. In several states, geoscientists may need a license to offer their services to the public. The median annual wage for geoscientists was $90,890 in May 2012. Employment of geoscientists is projected to grow 16 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for energy, environmental protection, and responsible land and resource management is projected to spur demand for geoscientists in the future.

Geoscientists

Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future. They Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists. Most geoscientists split their time between working indoors in offices and laboratories, and working outdoors. Doing research and investigations outdoors is commonly called fieldwork and can require irregular working hours and extensive travel to remote locations. Geoscientists need at least a bachelor’s degree for most entry-level positions. However, some workers begin their careers as geoscientists with a master’s degree. The median annual wage for geoscientists was $89,850 in May 2017. Employment of geoscientists is projected to grow 14 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for energy, environmental protection, and responsible land and resource management is projected to spur demand for geoscientists in the future.

Geological and Petroleum Technicians

Geological and petroleum technicians assist scientists or engineers in the use of electronic, sonic, or nuclear measuring instruments in both laboratory and production activities to obtain data indicating potential resources such as metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum. Analyze mud and drill cuttings. Chart pressure, temperature, and other characteristics of wells or bore holes. Investigate and collect information leading to the possible discovery of new metallic ore, minerals, gas, coal, or petroleum deposits. Geological and petroleum technicians typically need an associate’s degree or 2 years of postsecondary training in applied science or a science-related technology. Some jobs may require a bachelor’s degree. Geological and petroleum technicians also receive on-the-job training. The median annual wage for geological and petroleum technicians was $54,190 in May 2017. Employment of geological and petroleum technicians is projected to grow 16 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for natural gas is expected to increase demand for geological exploration and extraction in the future.

Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers

Mining and geological engineers design mines to safely and efficiently remove minerals such as coal and metals for use in manufacturing and utilities. Many mining and geological engineers work where mining operations are located, such as mineral mines or sand-and-gravel quarries, in remote areas or near cities and towns. Others work in offices or onsite for oil and gas extraction firms or engineering services firms. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited engineering program is required to become a mining or geological engineer. The median annual wage for mining and geological engineers was $94,240 in May 2017. Employment of mining and geological engineers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth for mining and geological engineers will be driven by demand for mining operations. In addition, as companies look for ways to cut costs, they are expected to contract more services with engineering services firms, rather than employ engineers directly.

Displaying 1 - 50 of 227 companies
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Company City State
Region 8, Mid-Coast School of Technology
MID-COAST SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Ellsworth School Department
Hancock Co Technical Ctr
United States Dept of Geological Survey
Capitol Area Technical Center
Maine Department of Environmental Protection
Island Institute
Region 9 School of Applied Technology
Maine Vocational Region 11
Oxford Hills Technical School
The Nature Conservancy
Maine Field Office
Maine Coast Heritage Trust
John P Lortie
Maine Region 10 Technical High School
Maine Region Ten Technical
University of Maine System
Water Reaserch Institute
Laudholm Farm
Biddeford School District
Biddeford Rgonal Ctr Technical
Gunderboom Inc
Natural Resources Council of Maine Inc
Vassalboro Public Schools
Mid-Maine Technical Center
S.W. Cole Engineering, Inc.
Geotechnical Consultants
Maine Coast Heritage Trust Inc
Integral Consulting Inc.
Maine School Administrative District No 46
Tri-County Technical Center
Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
Tetra Tech, Inc.
Natural Resource Department
Coastal Mountains Land Trust
Conservation Law Foundation, Inc.
Gei Consultants, Inc.
Somerset Career & Technical Center
Skowhgan Rgonal Vocational Ctr
TRC Environmental Corporation
TRC Companies
Region 2 School of Applied Technology
Environment Northeast Inc
ENVIRONMENT NORTHEAST
Aquarion Engineering Services Company
United States Dept of Geological Survey
Maine Water Science Center
Regional School Unit 01
Bath Rgnal Creer Technical Ctr
Geological Survey, Maine
Ransom Consulting, Inc.
Regional School Unit 33/Maine School Administrative District 33
St. John Valley Technology Ctr
Sewall Forestry and Natural Resources Consulting LLC
Cobscook Bay Resource Center Inc
Summit Environmental Consultants Inc
St.germain Collins
Growsmart Maine
Biohaven Environmental Solutions, LLC
Ramboll US Corporation
Ramboll Environ
Eastern Trail Alliance
Air Pollution Characterization & Control, Ltd.
Apcc
Quality House
Maine Island Trail Assoc
MITA
Crabtree Neck Land Trust
Displaying 1 - 50 of 227 companies
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