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Employers of Environmental Engineering majors in KS

Environmental engineers use the principles of engineering, soil science, biology, and chemistry to develop solutions to environmental problems. They are involved in efforts to improve recycling, waste disposal, public health, and water and air pollution control. Environmental engineers work in a variety of settings because of the nature of the tasks they do. When they are working with other engineers and urban and regional planners, environmental engineers are likely to be in offices. When they are carrying out solutions through construction projects, they are likely to be at construction sites. Environmental engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering or a related field, such as civil, chemical, or general engineering. Employers also value practical experience. Therefore, cooperative engineering programs, which provide college credit for structured job experience, are valuable as well. Getting a license improves the chances of employment. The median annual wage for environmental engineers was $80,890 in May 2012. Employment of environmental engineers is projected to grow 15 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. State and local government concerns regarding water should lead to efforts to increase the efficiency of water use.

Environmental Engineers

Environmental engineers use the principles of engineering, soil science, biology, and chemistry to develop solutions to environmental problems. They are involved in efforts to improve recycling, waste disposal, public health, and water and air pollution control. They research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology. Environmental engineers work in a variety of settings because of the nature of the tasks they do. When they are working with other engineers and urban and regional planners, environmental engineers are likely to be in offices. When they are carrying out solutions through construction projects, they are likely to be at construction sites. Environmental engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering or a related field, such as civil, chemical, or general engineering. Employers also value practical experience. Therefore, cooperative engineering programs, which provide college credit for structured job experience, are valuable as well. The median annual wage for environmental engineers was $86,800 in May 2017. Employment of environmental engineers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. State and local governments’ concerns regarding water availability and quality should lead to efforts to increase the efficiency of water use.

Environmental Engineering Technicians

Environmental engineering technicians carry out the plans that environmental engineers develop. They test, operate, and, if necessary, modify equipment used to prevent or clean up environmental pollution. They may collect samples for testing, or they may work to mitigate sources of environmental pollution. Most environmental engineering technicians work full time. They typically work indoors, usually in laboratories, and often have regular working hours. However, they must sometimes work irregular hours in order to monitor operations. Environmental engineering technicians typically need an associate’s degree in environmental engineering technology or a related field. The median annual wage for environmental engineering technicians was $50,230 in May 2017. Employment of environmental engineering technicians is projected to grow 13 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Employment in this occupation typically is tied to projects created by environmental engineers. State and local governments’ concerns regarding water availability and quality should lead to efforts to increase the efficiency of water use.

Hydrologists

Hydrologists study how water moves across and through the Earth’s crust. They use their expertise to solve problems in the areas of water quality or availability. Hydrologists work in offices and in the field. In offices, hydrologists spend much of their time using computers to analyze data and model their findings. In the field, hydrologists may have to wade into lakes and streams to collect samples or to read and inspect monitoring equipment. Hydrologists need at least a bachelor’s degree for entry-level positions; however, some workers begin their careers with a master’s degree. The median annual wage for hydrologists was $79,990 in May 2017. Employment of hydrologists is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Population growth and environmental concerns are expected to increase demand for hydrologists.

Displaying 1 - 50 of 315 companies
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Company City State
Environmental Protection Agency
Aptim Environmental & Infrastructure, Inc.
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
OLATHE, CITY OF (INC)
Olathe Engineering Dept
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Nrcs State Office
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
Bureau of Air and Radiation
Landplan Engineering PA
L P E
Pace Analytical Services, Inc.
PACE ANALYTICAL SERVICES, INC.
Professional Service Industries, Inc.
Intertech PSI
Srd Environmental Services Inc
SE Kansas Nature Center of Schermerhorn
County of Johnson
Environmental Department
Ramboll Environ US Corporation
RAMBOLL ENVIRON US CORPORATION
United States Department of Agriculture
Remediation Services, Inc.
R S I
Soil Conservation Service USDA
Continental Analytical Services Inc
Environmental Advisors & Engineers Inc
Arcadis U.S., Inc.
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
North Central Office
Hydrogeologic, Inc.
Hydro Geologic
Systech Environmental Corp
Geocore Inc.
Natural Resource Protection Inc.
Stantec Consulting Services Inc.
The Land Institute
Pfefferkorn & Daldridge Engineering LLC
Applied Ecological Services, Inc.
Air & Waste Management Association
Dpra Incorporated
The Nature Conservancy
Kansas Chapter
The Nature Conservancy
Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
MEITLER CONSULTING, INC.
KLA Environmental Services Inc
Grassland Heritage Foundation
Fire Consulting & Case Review International Inc
Fcii
Airsource Technologies Inc
Blackstone Environmental, Inc.
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Nrcs Area Office
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Nrcs Area Office
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Ecology and Environment Inc.
Specpro Environmental Services, LLC
Larsen & Associates Inc
Pfefferkorn Engineering & Environmental, LLC
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Rooks County Conservation District
Trinity Analytical Laboratories, Inc.
Strata, LLC
Geostat Environmental
Displaying 1 - 50 of 315 companies
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